Tuesday, October 10, 2006

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Thursday, May 18, 2006

DDLJ Dilwale Dhulania Le Jayenge

Dilwale Dulhania Le Jayenge, also known as DDLJ (English: The One with a True Heart Will Take the Bride) is an Indian film which premiered on October 19, 1995 and was released nationwide on October 20, 1995. The film was made by Aditya Chopra, and stars Shahrukh Khan, Kajol, and Amrish Puri. As of May 2005, the film had made the record books by completing 500 weeks of continuous play in Maratha Mandir, a Mumbai cinema. In many ways it is a typical Bollywood film, with songs, dance numbers, and lovers cavorting in scenic locations. There are fisticuffs, comic interludes, and a stern father insisting on an arranged marriage. However, there are also fresh, new elements. It was one of the first Bollywood films to feature Indians living outside India, and one of the first to film on location in Switzerland. The film was included in the Cinema India showcase, "The Changing Face of Indian Cinema", which toured the United States in July and August 2004. Film critic Charles Taylor of Salon.com wrote: "It's a flawed, contradictory movie — aggressive and tender, stiff and graceful, clichéd and fresh, sophisticated and naive, traditional and modern. It's also, I think, a classic." The film is a story of two young Indians, Raj and Simran, played by Shah Rukh Khan and Kajol, living in the United Kingdom. Simran meets Raj on a graduation trip, and after some initial misadventures, they fall in love. Simran goes home and tells her family about it. Her father, played by Amrish Puri, will have nothing to do with a love marriage, and is adamant that she marry his best friend's son. Her mother is considerate of Simran's feelings, but has no power over the domineering father. Simran's father takes her back to the Punjab, and soon wedding preparations are in full swing. Raj follows Simran to India and vows to marry her, but only with her family's consent. Eloping would be an easy option for them, but winning over her father seems impossible. Raj pretends to be a friend of the groom's family. Later, his real identity is revealed, and a confrontation with Simran's father occurs. In the end, her father realises the unconditional love that Raj has for his daughter, he melts and allows him to take away Simran with him. DDLJ at MovieDesi.com DDLJ at MovieDesi.com DDLJ at MovieDesi.com DDLJ at MovieDesi.com DDLJ at MovieDesi.com DDLJ at MovieDesi.com DDLJ at MovieDesi.com DDLJ at MovieDesi.com DDLJ at MovieDesi.com DDLJ at MovieDesi.com DDLJ at MovieDesi.com DDLJ at MovieDesi.com DDLJ at MovieDesi.com DDLJ at MovieDesi.com DDLJ at MovieDesi.com DDLJ at MovieDesi.com DDLJ at MovieDesi.com DDLJ at MovieDesi.com DDLJ at MovieDesi.com DDLJ at MovieDesi.com DDLJ at MovieDesi.com DDLJ at MovieDesi.com DDLJ at MovieDesi.com DDLJ at MovieDesi.com DDLJ at MovieDesi.com DDLJ at MovieDesi.com DDLJ at MovieDesi.com DDLJ at MovieDesi.com DDLJ at MovieDesi.com DDLJ at MovieDesi.com DDLJ at MovieDesi.com DDLJ at MovieDesi.com DDLJ at MovieDesi.com DDLJ at MovieDesi.com DDLJ at MovieDesi.com DDLJ at MovieDesi.com DDLJ at MovieDesi.com DDLJ at MovieDesi.com DDLJ at MovieDesi.com DDLJ at MovieDesi.com DDLJ at MovieDesi.com DDLJ at MovieDesi.com DDLJ at MovieDesi.com DDLJ at MovieDesi.com

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Tuesday, May 16, 2006

True Bollywood Story

History Cinema first came to India in 1896, when the Lumière Brothers’ Cinematographe showed six short films in the Watson Hotel. Three years later, Harishchandra Bhatvadekar shot and exhibited two short films. Following this, there were several attempts to film staged plays and imported films were shown in the first decade of the 20th century. The first indigenous silent feature film was Raja Harishchandra, released in 1913 and directed by Dadasaheb Dhundiraj Govind Phalke, who is considered the father of Indian cinema. The movie industry was well established by 1920, producing an average of 27 films every year. By the 1930s, the industry was producing over 200 films per annum. The first Indian sound film, Ardeshir Irani's Alam Ara (1931), was a super hit. There was clearly a huge market for talkies and musicals; Bollywood and all the regional film industries quickly switched to sound filming. The 1930s and 1940s were tumultuous times: India was buffeted by the Great Depression, World War II, the Indian independence movement, and the violence of the Partition. Most Bollywood films were unabashedly escapist, but there were also a number of filmmakers who tackled tough social issues, or used the struggle for Indian independence as a backdrop for their plots. In the late 1950s, Bollywood films moved from black-and-white to color. Lavish romantic musicals and melodramas were the staple fare at the cinema. Successful actors include Dev Anand and Raj Kapoor. In the 1970s and 1980s, romantic confections made way for gritty, violent, films about gangsters and bandits. Amitabh Bachchan, the star known for his "angry young man" roles, rode the crest of this trend. In the early 1990s, the pendulum swung back towards family-centric romantic musicals with the success of such films as Hum Aapke Hain Koun (1994) and Dilwale Dulhania Le Jayenge (1995). The Indian film industry has preferred films that appeal to all segments of the audience (see the discussion in Ganti, 2004, cited in references), and has resisted making films that target narrow audiences. It was believed that aiming for a broad spectrum would maximize box office receipts. However, filmmakers may be moving towards accepting some box-office segmentation, between films that appeal to rural Indians, and films that appeal to urban and overseas audiences.

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